Hot Brown Honey – Review (Feminist Fest)

Hot Brown Honey… where to even begin?

Branded as ‘hip hop politics’, the all-female troupe are experts in comedy, spoken word, dance and cabaret. They are truly a revolution. With their seductive ways, they’ll invite you into their beehive and show you a whole new world. Preaching intersectional feminism, the Honeys will have you jumping out of your seat, chanting along and swaying to the music all in the name of social freedom.

From a jokey scene involving a care-free ‘typical Western tourist’ to a chilling 911 call from a victim of domestic violence, the performers skilfully give us a taste of their repertoire. In between the jokes and seamless choreographic dances, they drive home an important message: that inequality is rife in our society. It may range from subtle microaggressions, the ‘can I touch your hair?’ and ‘where are you really from?’, to the blatant racism in the sale of golliwogs in Australia. Our ignorance ends in violence and racial perceptions are steeped in blood.

As I’m writing this, the last hours of my being a seventeen year old are dwindling. The vestiges of my adolescence are a reminder that a different world is yet to come. The Honeys may be fun but they never fail to point out the injustices in society. A powerful political piece, Hot Brown Honey captures and retains the attention of the audience for the entirety of the show. Once it’s finished, you’ll be wanting to rewind and watch it all over again.

A clear 5 star show, the Honeys are right in saying “fighting the power never tasted so sweet”.

Advertisements

Ayah-Sofia reviews: Whiteout

Check out my #feministfest 2016 review on Barrowland Ballet’s ”Whiteout” performance!

#FeministFest

Behold, a black screen. A girl floating; her body a piece of clay. She is lost in time and space. Wrapped in confusion but nonetheless ever serene. She is all of us and yet she is unique. Her fluid motions set her free from the world’s painful, unrelenting grip. In the midst of chaos, she is finding herself.

Barrowland Ballet‘s dance and physical theatre performance Whiteoutis a little crazy, a lot of fun and very symbolic. Opening with a powerful introduction, the strong dancing ensemble stagger their way through each chapter of their lives, discovering new challenges and overcoming social stigma as they find themselves in bi-racial relationships.

At the beginning of their journey, we are witnesses to their confinement and daily struggles. Our senses overwhelmed by the commanding music, we zero in on their every move; each pirouette, jump and pose executed with precision.

At times…

View original post 190 more words