Hot Brown Honey – Review (Feminist Fest)

Hot Brown Honey… where to even begin?

Branded as ‘hip hop politics’, the all-female troupe are experts in comedy, spoken word, dance and cabaret. They are truly a revolution. With their seductive ways, they’ll invite you into their beehive and show you a whole new world. Preaching intersectional feminism, the Honeys will have you jumping out of your seat, chanting along and swaying to the music all in the name of social freedom.

From a jokey scene involving a care-free ‘typical Western tourist’ to a chilling 911 call from a victim of domestic violence, the performers skilfully give us a taste of their repertoire. In between the jokes and seamless choreographic dances, they drive home an important message: that inequality is rife in our society. It may range from subtle microaggressions, the ‘can I touch your hair?’ and ‘where are you really from?’, to the blatant racism in the sale of golliwogs in Australia. Our ignorance ends in violence and racial perceptions are steeped in blood.

As I’m writing this, the last hours of my being a seventeen year old are dwindling. The vestiges of my adolescence are a reminder that a different world is yet to come. The Honeys may be fun but they never fail to point out the injustices in society. A powerful political piece, Hot Brown Honey captures and retains the attention of the audience for the entirety of the show. Once it’s finished, you’ll be wanting to rewind and watch it all over again.

A clear 5 star show, the Honeys are right in saying “fighting the power never tasted so sweet”.

Key Change: Fringe Review

I’m excited to announce that I am part of the feminist fest blogging team this summer as supported by Engender and YWCA Scotland. I’ve just finished a review on an amazing show called Key Change. Please check it out, and check out the other reviews because they’re simply wonderful! They’ll tell you all you need to know about the must-see shows in Edinburgh involving gender and equality.

Key Change is a powerful show exploring the lives of female convicts affected by gender violence and domestic abuse. Their story sounds all too familiar for the thousands of women trapped in the UK criminal justice system.

We’re given a performance that toes the line between entertainment and reality. We observe the lives of teenagers, mothers, addicts, and most importantly – women.

This theatrical piece is wonderfully written, and gives us an insight into the lives of forgotten women. Through powerful music and choreography, we’re transported to a different world full of emotional turmoil and heartbreak.

This isn’t a tale of friendship. It’s a tale of survival.

As the prisoners list all the things they miss in their former lives, one line particularly resonated with me:

“I miss being treated with respect.”

In captivity, women are denied recognition, and have their identity stripped away.

Make no mistake: this performance doesn’t end with a happily ever after. It’s raw, dark, and honest. It’s the reality for most female inmates.

One thing we know for sure is this. These women are not victims; they’re survivors.